Wednesday, 24 June 2020

What Is Dental Public Health? A Look At How It Can Help

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

Many oral diseases can be prevented with routine care and regular dental checkups. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to access adequate oral care. Dental public health programs work to rectify that. They provide assistance and programs so people can avoid the pain and discomfort poor oral health causes.

Recognized by the American Dental Association as a dental specialty since 1950, public dental programs focus on oral health issues within populations and communities rather than individuals. The goal is to assure optimal oral health among Americans through disease prevention and dental health promotion. Here are just a few examples of such programs that aim to improve the oral health of all Americans.

Dental Care for Students

Dental problems in kids can also affect a child's health and even his or her performance at school. In a study of 1,500 elementary to high school children from disadvantaged backgrounds in Los Angeles, California, 73 percent were found to have dental caries, says a study from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry at the University of Southern California. The study found a correlation between these dental issues, lower grades and increased missed school days.

Dental sealants can reduce child tooth decay by more than 70 percent, estimates the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is why several states have implemented school-based programs to provide sealants to children from low-income families who are at risk for cavities. Such programs identify a target market within a school district to meet the needs of children who are less likely to receive private dental care.

Dental Care for Seniors

Cost keeps many people away from the dentist, especially older adults. The problem: Avoiding preventive dental care will only lead to more extensive and expensive procedures later on. Furthermore, the severity of gum disease increases with age. As many as 23 percent of adults between the ages of 65 and 74 have severe gum disease, while people of all ages at the lowest socioeconomic level have the most severe gum disease, putting low-income seniors at risk, according to the CDC.

Medicare doesn't cover routine dental procedures and fewer than half of the states offer comprehensive dental benefits through Medicaid, leaving many seniors without necessary dental insurance. Some dental public health solutions include community outreach programs, like the Division of Geriatric Dentistry at Tufts University, which teaches the elderly about denture care and provides oral health and cancer screenings.

Dental Care for Expectant Moms

Dental care is especially important during pregnancy, but many women are unaware that oral health problems during this time can put both Mom and baby at risk. In a questionnaire provided to all maternity hospitals in the state of Iowa, 44 percent of women claimed they didn't visit a dentist during their pregnancy, reports the Iowa Department of Public Health. To help expectant moms stay informed and in charge of their overall health, the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families launched an app called Text4Baby, which educates mothers on their baby's development and baby care through their child's first year. It can also be used to set reminders for prenatal doctor and dentist visits, so that women can get the care they and their child need. Agencies on the federal, state and local level have partnered with this app to provide resources and information to expectant moms in their communities.

Preventive dental care, from using a quality toothbrush with extra soft bristles especially for sensitive gums like Colgate 360 Enamel Health Sensitive, to regular checkups, is vital for maintaining a healthy mouth and overall well-being. Dental public health programs can improve the lives of those who otherwise wouldn't have access to dental care, while increasing awareness of quality oral care for all.

To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Monday, 15 June 2020

What is Cosmetic Dentistry? Costs and Types

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

If your teeth are stained, discolored, worn, chipped, broken, misaligned, misshapen, or have gaps between them, modern cosmetic dentistry can give you a better smile. A “smile makeover” improves the appearance of your smile through one or more cosmetic dentistry procedures. Cosmetic dentists work with you to develop a treatment plan. Below you’ll find some information that can help you learn more about the various types of cosmetic dental procedures available.

Types of Cosmetic Dentistry

Teeth Whitening
Teeth whitening can be one of the simplest and least expensive ways to improve your smile. Teeth can be bleached with in-office products in your dentist’s office for about $500, or you can buy a mold and gels from your dentist to bleach your teeth at home. There are also whitening products available over the counter at retail stores for convenient at-home whitening: whitening toothpastes, rinses, and whitestrips. These products together run about $3 - $50.

Dental Veneers
Dental veneers are wafer-thin, custom-made shells of tooth-colored porcelain or resin that cover the front surface of the teeth. After removing about a half-millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface, these thin shells are bonded (cemented) to the front of the teeth, changing their color, shape, size, or length. Veneers are often called “Hollywood teeth." Living up to that name, this process can cost up to $500-$1,300 per tooth.

Dental Bonding
In dental bonding, a tooth-colored, putty-like resin, which is a durable plastic material, is applied to the tooth and hardened with an ultraviolet or laser light, bonding the material to the tooth. Your dentist then trims, shapes, and polishes it. Bonding can repair decayed, chipped, cracked, or misshapen teeth; it is also a good cosmetic alternative to, or replacement for, amalgam or silver fillings. Bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes, and $100 to $400, per tooth.

Dental Crown
A dental crown, also called a cap, fits over and replaces the entire decayed or damaged tooth above the gum line, restoring its shape, size, strength, and appearance. Crowns keep a weak tooth from breaking or hold a cracked tooth together; they can be used cosmetically to cover misshapen or severely discolored teeth. Crowns can be made from metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, resin, or ceramic, and cost about $500 to $900 each.

Inlays and Onlays
Inlays and onlays, also called indirect fillings, are made from gold, porcelain, or composite materials and fill decayed or damaged teeth. Dental fillings are molded into place during an office visit; however, inlays and onlays are created in a dental laboratory and bonded into place by your dentist. The filling is called an “inlay” when the material is bonded within the center of a tooth; it is called an “onlay” when the filling includes one or more points of the tooth or covers the biting surface. Inlays and onlays preserve as much healthy tooth as possible and are an alternative to crowns. This cosmetic dentistry procedure costs about $650 to $1,200 per tooth.

Dental Implants
Dental implants are titanium replacement tooth roots inserted into the bone socket of the missing tooth. As the jawbone heals, it grows around the implanted metal post, anchoring it securely in the jaw and providing a foundation for a replacement tooth. This procedure can cost anywhere from $1,250 to $3,000.

Other Options
A bridge is made of crowns for the teeth on either side of a gap with false teeth in between. A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth. Dental braces can straighten crooked or misaligned teeth and works by applying continuous pressure over a period of time to slowly move teeth in a specific direction.

To read the entire article visit crest.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Saturday, 6 June 2020

Scaling and Root Planing for Gum Disease

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Scaling and root planing is a deep cleaning below the gumline used to treat gum disease.

Why Do I Need It?
Gum disease is caused by a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Plaque is always forming on your teeth, but if they aren’t cleaned well, the bacteria in plaque can cause your gums to become inflamed. When this happens, your gums will pull away from your teeth and form spaces called pockets. Plaque then gets trapped in these pockets and cannot be removed with regular brushing. If untreated, gum disease could lead to bone and tooth loss.

If gum disease is caught early and hasn’t damaged the structures below the gum line, a professional cleaning should do. If the pockets between your gums and teeth are too deep, however, scaling and root planing may be needed.

A July 2015 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association finds that scaling and root planing is beneficial to patients with chronic periodontitis (gum disease that has advanced past gingivitis). Chronic periodontitis affects 47.2% of adults over 30 in the United States.

What Happens During Scaling and Root Planing?
This deep cleaning has two parts. Scaling is when your dentist removes all the plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) above and below the gumline, making sure to clean all the way down to the bottom of the pocket. Your dentist will then begin root planing, smoothing out your teeth roots to help your gums reattach to your teeth. Scaling and root planing may take more than one visit to complete and may require a local anesthetic.

After Care Tips
After a deep cleaning, you may have pain for a day or two and teeth sensitivity for up to a week. Your gums also may be swollen, feel tender and bleed.

To prevent infection, control pain or help you heal, your dentist may prescribe a pill or mouth rinse. Your dentist may also insert medication (subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline) directly into the pocket that was cleaned.

Your dentist will schedule another visit to see how your gums have healed and measure the depth of your pockets. If they have gotten deeper, more treatment may be needed.

Good dental care at home is essential to help keep gum disease from becoming more serious or recurring.  Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft brush, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, avoid using tobacco and see your dentist regularly.

To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Sunday, 24 May 2020

Dental Implants: A Permanent Tooth Replacement To Consider

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

One of the most notable technological advances in dentistry has to be the development of dental implants. Prior to their launch, the only options available to people who had lost a tooth were bridges or dentures. Dental implants offer an attractive and comfortable solution for those who have lost a tooth to decay or injury, providing a permanent replacement option that looks and feels like a real tooth.

Advantages of Dental Implants

Because a dental implant feels and looks like a normal tooth, it can do wonders for a patient's self-esteem. Many people who were shy about smiling due to a space from a lost tooth feel perfectly comfortable after a dental implant. Beyond the aesthetics, a dental implant also makes it easier to eat and speak, since a titanium post secured directly in the jaw holds the implant in place. Thus, an implant doesn't come loose like a denture. Dental implants also benefit general oral health since they do not have to be anchored to other teeth, like bridges.

Dental Implant Success Rates

Dental implant success can depend on where the missing teeth are located, but the average success rate is more than 95 percent, according to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). Because the implant penetrates the jaw bone and gum, certain people may not be a good fit for the procedure, such as those who smoke or suffer from diabetes. Your dentist will be able to evaluate whether dental implants are right for you.

Caring for a Dental Implant

Good oral health habits are required for the implant to be a success. Teeth must be flossed and brushed and regular dental visits should be made. It should be noted that most insurance companies do not cover the cost of a dental implant, and it can cost between $1000 to $2,000 per tooth and there is an additional cost for the crown that is attached to the dental implant. If you are missing a tooth and believe a dental implant might be the right solution for you, start by consulting your dentist.

To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Friday, 15 May 2020

Hormones and Dental Health: What Every Woman Needs to Know

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Your weight. Your mood. Your sex drive. Your dental health. There’s one thing that can make all these aspects of your health go haywire — hormones. 

You may be surprised to learn that hormone surges may make you more vulnerable to gum disease. Here’s why: More female hormones (estrogen and progesterone) cause more blood to flow to your gums, which causes them to become more sensitive and “overreact” to anything that may irritate them. “Women are more sensitive to the presence of plaque and bacteria around the gums when the hormone levels are high,” says ADA dentist Dr. Sally Cram. “This can cause your gums to become inflamed, swell and bleed. If left untreated, ongoing inflammation in the gums can also lead to bone loss around the teeth and eventual tooth loss.”
Your hormones are a fact of life, but gum disease not so much. It’s actually preventable and reversible in its early stages. So what’s a woman to do? Start by paying extra attention and taking good care of your mouth during these five times in your life.

Puberty
Raging hormones can leave a teenage girl’s gums red, swollen and bleeding. (In some cases, the gums’ overreaction to plaque may cause gums to actually grow bigger.) Some teenage girls may also find themselves developing canker sores, which usually heal on their own.

The best treatment? Prevention. “Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, floss once a day and see your dentist regularly,” Dr. Cram says. “Removing plaque and bacteria thoroughly every day can reduce the inflammation, discomfort and bleeding.”  

Your Period
You may not notice any change in your mouth in the days before your period. (If fact, most women don’t). But if you have swollen gums, bleeding gums, canker sores or swollen salivary glands, hormones may be to blame. These symptoms should subside after your period stops — but if they don’t, then the increased bleeding by your gums is signaling something else. Talk to your dentist if you have questions about how your monthly cycle and apparent health of your gums are related.

Stay on top of your daily dental health routine, and if you find you have more sensitivity than usual before or during your period, schedule cleanings for about a week after it ends.  

Using Birth Control Pills
Inflammation may have been a side effect for women taking birth control in the past, but today there’s good news for your gums. The levels of estrogen and progesterone in today’s birth control prescriptions are too low to cause any issues with your gums, according to a February 2013 review in the journal Periodontology 2000.  

Still, it’s important make sure your health history forms at the dentist are up to date if you are taking birth control. Here’s why:
  • Your dentist may need to write you a prescription, and some medications can make your birth control less effective. 
  • If you’re having a tooth removed, you may be more at risk for a painful complication called dry socket. According to the June 2016 Journal of the American Dental Association, women who use oral contraceptives are nearly twice as likely to experience dry socket compared to those who do not. Of 100 women who took birth control, 13.9 experienced dry socket. Only 7.54 of 100 women who did not take birth control had this complication.
Pregnancy
During pregnancy, your body is in hormonal hyper drive. Some women find they have developed pregnancy gingivitis — a mild form of gum disease that causes gums to be red, tender and sore. It is most common between the second and eighth months of pregnancy, and you can help keep it under control through good daily habits. “Stay on top of your brushing, stay on top of your flossing and be meticulous about the care of your entire body,” says ADA dentist Dr. Alice Boghosian. 

Visiting your dentist during pregnancy is incredibly important — and absolutely safe. In fact, your dentist may recommend more frequent cleanings during your second trimester and early third trimester to help control gingivitis. If you notice any other changes in your mouth during pregnancy, see your dentist. 

Menopause 
Menopause is a huge change in a woman’s life and a woman’s mouth, including altered taste, burning sensations in your mouth and increased sensitivity. “They’re all related to hormones,” Dr. Boghosian says.

Still, there are two critical changes to be aware of: dry mouth and bone loss. “Saliva cleanses the teeth and rinses cavity-causing bacteria off your teeth,” Dr. Boghosian says. “When you have dry mouth, your saliva flow decreases and you’re more at risk for cavities.”

Talk to your dentist if your mouth is feeling dry. “If dry mouth is a problem, suck on ice chips or sugar-free candy, drink water or other caffeine-free drinks and use an over-the-counter dry mouth spray or rinse to help reduce the dryness,” Dr. Cram says. “Your dentist may also recommend prescription strength fluoride toothpaste that helps reduce the risk of tooth decay.”

What you eat can also make a difference when it comes to dry mouth. Avoid salty, spicy, sticky and sugary foods, as well as and dry foods that are hard to chew. Alcohol, tobacco and caffeine can also make dry mouth worse. At night, sleeping with a humidifier on in your room can also make a difference.

Losing bone in your jaw can lead to tooth loss. “The decreased estrogen that occurs with menopause also puts you at risk for a loss of bone density,” Dr. Boghosian says. “Signs of bone loss in your jaw can be something as simple as receding gums. When your gums recede, more of your tooth is exposed and that puts more of your tooth at risk for decay. And if your mouth is dry, that’s a double whammy.”

To help reduce your risk of bone loss, work with your dentist or physician to make sure you’re getting the right amount of calcium and vitamin D, don’t smoke and avoid excessive alcohol consumption.

To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Wednesday, 6 May 2020

Erupted Tooth: Pericoronitis Symptoms and Treatment

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

What is Pericoronitis?

Since wisdom teeth come in during late adolescence, pericoronitis is a form of gum disease that usually affects those between the ages of twenty and forty. Often the wisdom teeth are not able to come out fully due to a lack of room in the mouth, leading to a partially erupted tooth. The partial tooth eruption then leads to inflammation and infection of the soft tissue which surrounds it. 

Symptoms of Pericoronitis

Symptoms often vary from one individual to the next and can occur chronically or acutely.
Those suffering from chronic or reoccurring pericoronitis may experience:
  • Mild discomfort around the affected area
  • Dull toothache
  • Bad breath
  • A foul taste in the mouth
Symptoms last for 1 to 2 days but continuously reappear without proper treatment. 
Acute pericoronitis is usually caused by poor oral hygiene. This is relatively common since the wisdom teeth, located toward the back of the mouth, can be difficult to clean with manual brushing alone. Symptoms may include:
  • Pus discharge from affected area
  • Pain when swallowing
  • Extensive pain making it difficult to sleep
  • Swelling of the face
  • Swollen lymph nodes under the chin
  • Fever
Acute pericoronitis symptoms usually last about three to four days. 

Treatment for Pericoronitis

The condition can be hard to treat due to the gum flap which has resulted from the partially erupted tooth. Often, the issue won’t go away completely until the tooth fully erupts from the gum line, or the tooth/soft tissue has been removed. 

For mild cases, a dentist may recommend the following treatments:
  • Comprehensive cleaning
  • Removing any food, debris, or residue trapped inside the gum flap
  • Draining of the pus to reduce inflammation
  • Rinsing with a fluoride mouthwash containing an antibacterial agent such as CPC (Cetyl-pyridinium chloride) or salt mixture 
  • Antibiotics to manage the infection 
As with any form of gum disease, you should always follow a thorough oral care routine of brushing twice a day and flossing at least once. If your symptoms persist, see your dental professional right away. It is crucial to treat any sign of infection as soon as possible before it spreads to other areas of the mouth and jawline.

To read the entire article visit crest.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Friday, 24 April 2020

Sleep Apnea and Snoring

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Sleep apnea is a common and serious sleeping disorder that happens when your regular breathing is interrupted during sleep. Snoring is common among patients with sleep apnea but not all snorers have sleep apnea.

There are two main types of sleep apnea:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea. The more common form, it is the result of blocked airflow during sleep, usually when the soft tissue at the back of the throat collapses while you sleep. Health factors, such as obesity may contribute.
  • Central sleep apnea. Results from a problem with how the brain signals the breathing muscles. The airway is not blocked, instead the brain fails to signal the muscles to breath. This type of sleep apnea can occur with conditions such as heart failure, brain tumors, brain infections, and stroke. 

Sleep apnea can affect anyone at any age, although men are more likely to develop the disorder. The risk is also greater for those:

  • over 40
  • overweight
  • with large tonsils, large tongue or small jaw
  • with a family history of sleep apnea
  • with a nasal obstruction due to a deviated septum, allergies or sinus problems.

If left untreated, sleep apnea can result in a number of health problems including:

  • high blood pressure
  • stroke
  • heart failure, irregular heartbeat and heart attack
  • diabetes
  • depression
  • worsening of ADHD.

Sleep apnea can be treated. There are several options:

  • Adjusting sleeping habits. This may mean simply not sleeping on your back
  • Continuous positive air pressure (CPAP). This is a device which improves breathing while you sleep. The device supplies air through the nasal passages and the air pressure keeps the airway open while sleeping.
  • Oral appliances. Certain oral devices can shift and support the jaw to prevent the airway from collapsing. Research shows that oral appliances can successfully prevent sleep apnea in some mild to moderate cases.
  • Surgery. According to the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine upper airway surgery may be recommended when other treatment options are unsuccessful in eliminating the symptoms of sleep apnea. Depending on the location and nature of the airway obstruction, the procedure may be minimally invasive or more complex. It may be necessary to remove the tonsils or other parts of the soft palate or throat.
If you think you have sleep apnea, make sure to speak with your physician or dentist for more information and possible evaluation.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Wednesday, 15 April 2020

Leukoplakia: Why do you have white gums?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com


Leukoplakia: What You Should Know
Leukoplakia is an oral disease where white or gray patches show up on or around the gums, inside of the cheeks, on the bottom of the mouth, and sometimes on the tongue. These patches are the mouth’s reaction to irritation of the sensitive mucous membranes in the mouth.
If you’ve seen these patches in your mouth, you should make an appointment with your dentist or doctor. They can help identify what’s causing it as well as help you treat it.

What Causes Leukoplakia?

Outside of knowing that leukoplakia is the body’s reaction to irritation inside the mouth, there isn’t a specific cause that scientists have identified. However, there are some triggers that can make it more likely.
  • Long-term tobacco usage (the most common trigger)
  • Long-term alcohol usage
  • Broken or ill-fitting dental appliances, fillings, or crowns
  • Injury from jagged or broken teeth 
  • Underlying diseases like oral cancer or HIV/AIDS

What Are The Symptoms of Leukoplakia?

White or gray colored patches on your gums or tongue, the inside of your cheeks, or bottom of your mouth are a sign of leukoplakia. These patches may be flat or irregularly textured, and can be thickened or hardened in some places. Leukoplakia isn’t usually painful, but it can be sensitive to touch, heat, irritation, and spicy or acidic foods. Unlike some other oral diseases, leukoplakia can’t be wiped or brushed away.
There is also a second kind of leukoplakia called “hairy leukoplakia.” In this variety, the patches are usually on the sides of the tongue and take on a fuzzy appearance.
In some cases, both types of leukoplakia are also accompanied by raised, red lesions, which can be a sign of other diseases.

How to Treat Leukoplakia

The best way to treat leukoplakia is to remove the source of irritation that’s causing it, either by stopping or reducing tobacco and alcohol usage or fixing dental appliances. It’s a good idea to address these issues with the help of your dentist or doctor, since they may want to run tests to rule out underlying illnesses. You will definitely need to see them in the case of hairy leukoplakia since an antiviral medication is required. And though leukoplakia usually heals on its own, you may have to have oral surgery to remove the patches.

To read the entire article visit crest.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Monday, 6 April 2020

What Are Veneers And How Should You Care For Them?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

The right veneers are a quick way to a beautiful smile, and this treatment is perfect for people with teeth that are stained, chipped or have gaps. But veneers are an irreversible treatment, so having them placed is a big decision. Before you and your dentist decide the procedure is right for you, it's important to have the right information about veneers, their cost and how best to care for them.
What are Veneers?
According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), a veneer is a "thin piece of porcelain used to re-create the natural look of teeth, while also providing strength and resilience comparable to natural tooth enamel." They are custom made to the contour of your teeth and are bonded to the tooth's original enamel during a series of in-office procedures.
Why are Veneers Used in Dentistry?
Veneers are a less intrusive option than crowns or braces. According to the British Dental Health Foundation, veneers can be used to close gaps or correct small misalignments. Patients also choose veneers as a comestic solution to enhance the brightness of their teeth and to straighten their smile, correcting issues like discoloration, fractures, or chips.
Porcelain Veneers
The most commonly used material for veneers are the conventional porcelain veneer and Lumineers and composite resin veneers. AACD, porcelain veneers are preferable for correcting issues of shape or color and can last anywhere from 10 to 20 years. They can cost anywhere from $800 to $2,000 per tooth depending on what part of the United States you live in, which can be a major expense for most consumers, so it's important to know they will need to be replaced eventually.
Placing Veneers
The typical process takes one to two appointments. If the veneer is prefabricated it usually takes one appointment and if the laboratory is creating the veneer it takes two appointments. We will focus on highlighting placement of the porcelain veneer created by the laboratory:
  1. Local anesthetia is not usually required when placing veneers. However, depending on the patient's sensitivity, it can be used if needed. The dentist will clean the tooth and determine the correct shade for the veneer. The dentist will remove a very small amount of the enamel of the tooth to provide room to place the veneer on the tooth.
  2. An impression of the tooth will be made for the laboratory and a temporary veneer will be placed on the tooth with spot etching in the center of the tooth away from the margins.
  3. After the laboratory has delivered the porcelain veneer to your dentist, the temporary veneer is removed, the tooth is cleaned with pumice and water. The veneer is then etched, rinsed throughly with water and air dried. The adhesive is placed on the preparation and then the cement and the veneer is placed for exact fit and contour.
  4. The veneer is then light cured for 60 seconds on all surfaces of it to attach it to the tooth structure.
  5. Your dentist will remove any excess material and polish the margins of the veneer.
Many dentists will schedule a follow-up visit to check for comfort; a comfortable veneer will be a long-lasting veneer.
Care for Veneers
The AACD suggests brushing and flossing just as you would your regular teeth. Proper daily brushing, and use of non-abrasive fluoride toothpaste. Consider limiting coffee and other stain-inducing foods.
Keep in mind that veneers will need to be replaced at some point, no matter how well you take care of them. But proper oral hygiene will help them last as long as possible.
If you're deciding on veneers, consult with your dentist and be sure you understand every part of the process and cost. A beautiful smile feels great and can increase both your confidence and well-being.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com 

Tuesday, 24 March 2020

Tooth Extraction: Procedure, Healing, & Complications

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

A tooth extraction is an outpatient procedure performed by a dentist. In some cases pulling teeth (removing a tooth completely from its spot in the jaw bone), may be necessary to preserve or improve your dental health.

Some of the reasons for tooth extraction include:
  • Pulling teeth for braces: Preparation for orthodontia (braces and retainers) often involves pulling one tooth or a few teeth.
  • Pulling teeth to save space: Wisdom teeth are often removed if there is no space for them in the mouth, or if they become impacted or infected.
  • Pulling teeth due to damage or decay: Tooth extraction may be the only option if a tooth is too decayed or damaged to be repaired with a filling or crown.
  • Pulling teeth in radiation or chemotherapy patients: If radiation or chemotherapy to the head and neck causes teeth to become infected, pulling teeth may be necessary.
Tooth Extraction Procedure: Getting a Tooth Pulled
When you undergo a tooth extraction procedure, your dentist will numb the area with a local anesthetic. You may also receive an anti-anxiety medication or an intravenous sedative. If the dental extraction involves an impacted tooth, the tooth may be broken into pieces before it is removed.

Pulling teeth falls into two basic categories: simple and surgical. Here’s what to expect from each:
  • Simple: A simple tooth extraction involves the removal of a tooth that is visible in the mouth. This could mean removing a badly damaged or decayed tooth, or removing teeth prior to getting braces. General dentists can do simple tooth extractions. When you undergo simple tooth extraction, you will receive local anesthesia. In addition, some dental professionals administer anti-anxiety medication or use conscious sedation for simple cases of pulling teeth. In most cases, over-the-counter pain medication is sufficient for pain management after these procedures.
  • Surgical: Surgical tooth extraction is an operation by an oral surgeon involving removal of teeth that are not visible in the mouth, because they have not come in or because the tooth has broken off. Individuals with special medical conditions may receive general anesthesia when pulling teeth involving surgery. You may also receive prescription pain medication for use immediately after surgical teeth-pulling procedures.
Tooth Extraction Healing and Recovery
After any type of tooth extraction, be sure to follow your dental professional’s instructions for oral care, including the following tips:
  • Eat Soft Foods: Stick primarily to liquids until any anesthesia wears off, and then limit your diet to soft foods for the first few days after a tooth extraction.
  • Take care of your teeth: Don’t brush the teeth immediately next to the area of tooth extraction on the first day after the procedure, but do brush the rest of your teeth. Two days after a tooth extraction, get back to a good oral care routine.
Tooth Extraction Complications
“Dry socket” occurs in approximately 3-4% of teeth pulling cases. If a blood clot fails to form in the hole after pulling teeth, or if the blood clot breaks off too soon, the underlying bone is exposed, creating a dry socket. This condition can be painful and should be treated as soon as possible with a medicated bandage to promote healing.

Other potential problems associated with pulling teeth include:
  • Sore Jaw: Your jaw may be sore due to anesthesia or to the strain of keeping your mouth open during the procedure.
  • Numb Lips and Chin: If the reason for pulling teeth was removal of lower wisdom teeth, your lower lip or chin may be numb for several months if a nerve in that area (the inferior alveolar nerve) was traumatized.
  • Infection: Infection is always a possibility after pulling teeth, but it is unlikely in individuals who have healthy immune systems.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Dental Group of Meriden-Wallingford
298 Broad Street
Meriden, CT 06450
Phone: (203) 235-5588
DentalGroupCT.com